Morning News Briefing

Written by on January 22, 2020

Governor Andrew Cuomo has proposed an overhaul of the Medicaid system, in order to deal with an expected shortfall.
Cuomo proposed in his Budget Address yesterday that municipalities where Medicaid spending grows by over three-percent should pay extra.
The Governor says that right now, the Medicaid cost to local governments is fixed a system which doesn’t work.
Batavia Assemblyman Steve Hawley offered a simple solution to the budget shortfall saying the obvious answer is to cut certain Medicaid options…

Cuomo also proposed what he calls the nation’s most aggressive climate change program, additional infrastructure spending, and a new formula in terms of funding schools.
Finally, Governor Cuomo re-stated his desire to see marijuana legalized for adults, saying that the budget is the best option towards getting it passed.

Another candidate has announced a run for the vacant 27th Congressional District seat.
Erie County Comptroller Stefan Mychajliw has entered the race to replace ex-Congressman Chris Collins.
Mychajliw is seeking the Republican nomination and says he’s a true Conservative who can run and win.
The 27th District seat has been open since Collins stepped down last year after pleading guilty to federal insider trading charges.
A special election will likely happen in April.

A federal appeals court has dismissed three criminal counts against Sheldon Silver.
The ex-Assembly Speaker has been convicted twice on federal corruption charges.
The first guilty verdict was overturned and Silver appealed the second one, claiming the judge gave improper instructions to the jury.
Silver still faces prison time on the four felony counts the court didn’t throw out.

A new poll shows support for the state’s controversial bail reform law is declining.
The Siena Research Institute says only 37 percent of New Yorkers are behind the legislation, down from 55 percent last April.
The law went into effect January 1st, eliminating pre-trial detention and cash bail for a large number of non-violent felony and misdemeanor cases.
Lawmakers have discussed making changes to the legislation, but that likely won’t happen for a few months.


Reader's opinions

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


[There are no radio stations in the database]