Morning News Briefing

Written by on September 16, 2020

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he won’t ban trick-or-treating this year amid the COVID-19 pandemic). Many speculated that New York State may ban the annual Halloween tradition after officials in Los Angeles banned trick-or-treating and Halloween parties. Gov. Cuomo says that he doesn’t think banning trick-or-treating is appropriate.

Congressman Chris Jacobs (NY-27) joined Republican House members to unveil the Republican “Commitment to America” plan. The plan places emphasis on building small businesses and unleashing the American economy, returning safety to the streets and supporting law enforcement, strengthening educational opportunities, and investment in critical infrastructure, such as rural broadband. Jacobs says that throughout his public service career, he fully believes in the potential of Western New York.

The FBI academy says it is endorsing Bill Sheron for Genesee County Sheriff. As a law enforcement leader, the academy says Sheron has exemplified the motto of the FBI National Academy, “Knowledge, Courage, & Integrity”.
New York leaders say that six states have been removed from the State’s COVID-19 travel advisory. The states include California, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada and Ohio. Gov. Cuomo, while pleased…also says “Make no mistake: We must continue to be New York Tough and stay smart. Wearing masks, social distancing and hand washing is what tamed this beast in New York and we must keep it up.”

Court action is pending for a Churchville man who faces felony and other counts following his arrest by Genesee County sheriff’s deputies. 30-year-old Kyle Allen Hawley is charged with felony second-degree burglary along with lesser counts of criminal tampering and criminal mischief. In a press release, the sheriff’s department said members of the Probation Department took Hawley into custody on an active bench warrant. The investigation also found he had other active arrest warrants. He was arraigned and jailed without bail.

The Rochester City Council took action Tuesday night in the death of Daniel Prude last March in police custody. Council members voted unanimously to spend 100-thousand dollars on an independent investigation to find out what led to Prude’s death and how much city leaders, including the mayor, knew – before video of Prude’s arrest was released by a newspaper two weeks ago. That video has sparked daily protests since then – and the dismissal of city leaders, including the police chief.


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